Upper School

Upper School at Chesapeake Bay Academy

College & University Acceptances and Matriculation 2011-2016

Beacon College
Chapel Haven West
Christopher Newport University
Ferrum College
Goucher College
Longwood University
McDaniel College
Norfolk State University
Old Dominion University
Randolph-Macon College
Shenandoah University
University of Mary Washington
Virginia Commonwealth University
Virginia Military Institute
Virginia Wesleyan College
West Virginia Wesleyan College

The Upper School at Chesapeake Bay Academy provides a rigorous, accredited high school curriculum focused on academic and technology skills. Our environment combines both freedom and structure to encourage and support student success. Students have the opportunity to work with an Advocate to facilitate personal expression and develop a bond of trust and support. Individualized Learning Plans (IIP’s) are developed for each student based on the required curriculum and individualized accommodations are put into place in order to facilitate success.

Technology is an important focus of the Upper School program. Our Upper School is a paperless environment where students access texts in digital form on their tablets. Organizational structure is provided through the use of Edmodo, a customized online management tool. Through Edmodo, students and parents can communicate with teachers, keep track of assignments and projects and access grades. Teachers adapt their instruction to fit the learning needs of our students by individualizing instruction and assessment, often through the use of curriculum flipping and blended-learning environments.

Over the past 10 years, 90% of CBA graduates have gone on to pursue higher education at two-and four-year colleges and universities, locally and across the country. The remaining 10% of alumni have chosen careers in both the civilian and military workforces, many through CBA’s School-to-Work program. Graduates receive a standard private school diploma and leave ready for success, academically and in life.

Our students thrive in a structured setting. To support that need, we provide an environment with as few surprises as possible.  The following structures are put in place to help our students succeed.

Accommodations

The following accommodations are made wherever possible:

  • Individualization
  • Small class size
  • Use of Edmodo, an internet-based academic learning management system
  • E-books for all class texts
  • Curriculum Flipping
  • Direct instruction of self-advocacy skills
  • Preferential seating as necessary
  • Direct instruction on note taking and test taking
  • Multisensory instruction
  • Large fonts and white space used on tests and handouts
  • Lengthy assignments broken into small, manageable steps
  • Direct instruction of study skills
  • Organizational coaching
  • Transitional support / guidance

Promotion and graduation requirements are based on number of credits earned. Each year a student is enrolled in the upper school they will be placed in a minimum of 5 credit bearing courses.

Honors options are available in the following courses:

  • World Literature
  • American Literature
  • British Literature
  • World History: Eastern Hemisphere
  • United States History
  • American Government
  • Biology
  • Chemistry
  • Physics

To be considered for standard graduation, a student must earn a minimum of 21 credit hours.

To be considered for advanced graduation, a student must take:

  • Algebra II, 1 credit
  • Physics*, 1 credit
  • Foreign Language, 2 credits (Spanish I & II)

Click here to learn more about MAKE CBA, our new entrepreneurship program!

Advanced Scholars Program

CBA partners with our neighbor Virginia Wesleyan College, to make the Advanced Scholars, dual-enrollment program available to our twice-exceptional learners. Participating students receive college credit for completed classes.

ACT & SAT Scores

ACT
CBA Average - 24
National Average - 21

SAT
CBA Math Average - 510
National Average - 513
CBA Reading Average - 525
National Average - 497

Data includes averages over three years (2013 - 2016).

Download Upper School Profile

Upper School Curriculum

Select a Course below to read more about specific curriculum.
  Grade 9 Grade 10 Grade 11 Grade 12
English                                                             Course                                                             Course                                                             Course                                                             Course
Foreign Language                                                             Course                                                             Course                                                             Course                                                             Course
Math                                                             Course                                                             Course                                                             Course                                                             Course
Science                                                             Course                                                             Course                                                             Course                                                             Course
Social Studies                                                             Course                                                             Course                                                             Course                                                             Course
Technology                                                             Course                                                             Course                                                             Course                                                             Course

Kindergarten Math

What We Do

  • Number recognition and counting
  • Concept of one-to-one correspondence
  • Patterns and sorting
  • Basic addition and subtraction
  • Measurement using non-standard units
  • Concepts of odd and even, coin values and skip counting 
  • Gather and display data

How we do it

  • Counting patterns
  • Use of manipulatives (i.e. counters, number charts, number lines, coins, pattern blocks)
  • Group and independent games and activities
  • Group and independent activities utilizing technology (i.e. IPads, Smartboard)
  • Lessons and activities from Math Connects

Accommodations

  • Use of number lines
  • Shortened math lessons with fewer problems
  • Touch math
  • Large- numbered rulers
  • Multi-sensory activities
  • Guided practice
  • Redirection
  • Repetition
  • Individualized instruction

Kindergarten Reading

What We Do

  • Early phonemic and print awareness and listening comprehension skills
  • Beginning/ending sounds
  • Syllabication, rhyming, blends
  • Expand verbal vocabulary
  • Identify the parts of a books
  • Basic comprehension of fictional and nonfictional text

How we do it

  • Whole group, small group and individualized instruction
  •  Exposure to a variety of genres, comprehension strategies and decoding skills.
  • Games and activities
  • Alternative assessments
  • Story mapping
  • Computer assisted instruction
  • Group and independent activities utilizing technology (i.e. IPads, Smartboard)
  • Reading Street, Wilson Reading Program materials

Accommodations

  • Slower reading pace
  • Shortened lessons
  • Index card for tracking
  • Graphic organizers
  • Multi-sensory activities
  • Individualized instruction
  • Verbal cueing and prompting
  • Guided practice
  • Redirection
  • Repetition

Kindergarten Language Arts/Spelling/Handwriting

What We Do

  • Recognize and print upper and lower case letters
  • Recognize and identify vowels and consonants
  • Write to communicate ideas

How we do it

  • Whole group, small group and individualized instruction
  • Games and activities
  • Alternative assessments
  • Computer assisted instruction
  • Group and independent activities utilizing technology (i.e. IPads, Smartboard)
  • Handwriting Without Tears and Zaner-Bloser Handwriting are leading, multi-sensory and fun curricula for handwriting mastery. 

Accommodations

  • Verbal prompting
  • Redirection
  • Provision of a quiet corner for writing
  • Dictation of ideas to teacher
  • Choice of oral or written assessments
  • Shortened spelling lists

Kindergarten Science

What We Do

  • Five Senses
  • Magnetism and matter
  • Matter and Its Properties
  • Living and Nonliving Things
  • The Earth and its Patterns, Cycles, Changes

How we do it

  • Projects, writing activities and discussions
  • Collaborative projects and activities
  • Group and independent activities utilizing technology (i.e. IPads, Smartboard)
  • Lessons and activities from Science Fusion

Accommodations

  • Verbal prompting
  • Vary time allotted for tasks
  • Vary number of tasks
  • Visual maps/charts
  • Redirection

Kindergarten Social Studies

What We Do

  • What is History?
  • Things change over time
  • Location of people, places and things
  • People and their jobs
  • Needs and wants
  • Being a good citizen
  • Map skills

How we do it

  • Projects, writing activities and discussions
  • Collaborative projects and activities
  • Group and independent activities utilizing technology (i.e. IPads, Smartboard)

Accommodations

  • Verbal prompting
  • Vary time allotted for tasks
  • Vary number of tasks
  • Visual maps/charts
  • Redirection

Grade 1 Math

What We Do

  • Number order, number patterns, writing numbers, counting and number operations
  • Write equations, explore number families and place value
  • Identify parts of a set
  • Addition and subtraction facts to 18
  • Money, time, standard and nonstandard measurement, geometry

How we do it

  • Counting patterns
  • Story problems and practice using appropriate mathematical symbols
  • Experimentation with measurement using both standard and nonstandard units.
  • Use of manipulatives (i.e. counters, number line, base 10 blocks, pattern blocks)
  • Drill and practice
  • Problem solving
  • Games and practice in both independent and small group settings
  • Lessons and activities from Math Connects
  • Group and independent activities utilizing technology (i.e. IPads, Smartboard)

Accommodations

  • Use of number lines
  • Shortened math lessons with fewer problems
  • Touch math
  • Large- numbered rulers
  • Multi-sensory activities
  • Guided practice
  • Redirection
  • Repetition
  • Individualized instruction

Grade 1 Reading

What We Do

  • Identify and manipulate units of sounds within words
  • Increased phonemic awareness through spelling strategies and decoding of words
  • Expand verbal and written vocabulary
  • Apply knowledge of how print is organized and read
  • Basic comprehension of fictional and nonfictional text

How we do it

  • Whole group, small group and individualized instruction
  • Exposure to a variety of genres, comprehension strategies and decoding skills.
  • Think, pair, share
  • Games and activities
  • Alternative assessments
  • Story mapping
  • Computer assisted instruction
  • Group and independent activities utilizing technology (i.e. IPads, Smartboard)
  • Reading Street, Wilson Reading Program materials

Accommodations

  • Slower reading pace
  • Shortened lessons
  • Index card for tracking
  • Graphic organizers
  • Individualized instruction
  • Verbal cueing and prompting
  • Multi-sensory activities
  • Guided practice
  • Redirection
  • Repetition

Grade 1 Language Arts/Spelling/Handwriting

What We Do

  • Use descriptive words when writing
  • Print legibly and space letters, words and sentences appropriately
  • Use basic capitalization and punctuation in writing
  • Dictionary use and alphabetical order
  • Write to communicate ideas

How we do it

  • Whole group, small group and individualized instruction
  • Games and activities
  • Alternative assessments
  • Computer assisted instruction
  • Group and independent activities utilizing technology (i.e. IPads, Smartboard)
  • HandwritingWithout Tears and Zaner-Bloser Handwriting are leading, multi-sensory and fun curricula for handwriting mastery. 

Accommodations

  • Use of computers for writing
  • Verbal prompting
  • Redirection
  • Provision of a quiet corner for writing
  • Dictation of ideas to teacher
  • Choice of oral or written tests
  • Shortened spelling lists

Grade 1 Science

What We Do

  • Living and nonliving things
  • Life processes of living things
  • Seasonal changes
  • Force, energy, matter
  • Scientific Investigation

How we do it

  • Projects, writing activities and discussions
  • Group and independent activities utilizing technology (i.e. IPads, Smartboard)
  • Collaborative projects and activities
  • Lessons and activities from Science Fusion
  • Quizzes and tests

Accommodations

  • Verbal prompting
  • Vary time allotted for tasks
  • Vary number of tasks
  • Visual maps/charts
  • Redirection

Grade 1 Social Studies

What We Do

  • Past, present and future
  • American leaders and major holidays
  • American symbols
  • People and traditions
  • Basic map skills
  • How location affects people
  • Goods and services
  • Being a good citizen

How we do it

  • Projects, writing activities and discussions
  • Group and independent activities utilizing technology (i.e. IPads, Smartboard)
  • Collaborative projects and activities
  • Quizzes and tests

Accommodations

  • Verbal prompting
  • Vary time allotted for tasks
  • Vary number of tasks
  • Visual maps/charts
  • Redirection

Grade 2 Math

What We Do

  • Patterning, probability
  • Tell time to five minutes, place value, money
  • Fractions, weight, adding, subtracting, multiplication and geometry
  • Story problems and estimation

How we do it

  • Use of Manipulatives (i.e. counters, number line, base 10 blocks, fraction tiles, Geoboards)
  • Drill and practice
  • Problem solving
  • Games and practice in both independent and small group settings
  • Group and independent activities utilizing technology (i.e. IPads, Smartboard)
  • Lessons and activities from Math Connects

Accommodations

  • Use of number lines
  • Shortened math lessons with fewer problems
  • Touch math
  • Large- numbered rulers
  • Hands-on activities
  • Guided practice
  • Redirection
  • Repetition
  • Individualized instruction

Grade 2 Reading

What We Do

  • Identify and manipulate units of sounds within words
  • Increased phonemic awareness through spelling strategies and decoding of words
  • Expand verbal and written vocabulary
  • Demonstrate increased comprehension of fictional and nonfictional text and reference materials
  • Recognize cause-and-effect relationships in a text   
  • Sequence events by beginning, middle, end
  • Generate alternative endings to plots       

How we do it

  • Whole group, small group and individualized instruction
  • Exposure to a variety of genres, comprehension strategies and decoding skills.
  • Games and activities
  • Think, pair, share
  • Alternative assessments
  • Story mapping
  • Role playing
  • Computer assisted instruction
  • Group and independent activities utilizing technology (i.e. IPads, Smartboard)
  • Reading Street, Wilson Reading Program materials

Accommodations

  • Slower reading pace
  • Shortened lessons
  • Index card for tracking
  • Graphic organizers
  • Individualized instruction
  • Verbal cueing and prompting
  • Guided practice
  • Redirection
  • Repetition

Grade 2 Language Arts/Spelling/Handwriting

What We Do

  • Distinguish between complete and incomplete sentences
  • Identify and correctly use various parts of speech
  • Use reference materials
  • Expand verbal and written vocabulary
  • Begin the transition to cursive handwriting

How we do it

  • Whole group, small group and individualized instruction
  • Games and activities
  • Alternative assessments
  • Computer assisted instruction
  • Group and independent activities utilizing technology (i.e. IPads, Smartboard)
  • Handwriting Without Tears and Zaner-Bloser Handwriting are leading, multi-sensory and fun curricula for handwriting mastery. 

Accommodations

  • Use of computers for writing
  • Verbal prompting
  • Redirection
  • Provision of a quiet corner for writing
  • Dictation of ideas to teacher

Grade 2 Science

What We Do

  • Magnetism
  • The properties of matter
  • Plants and animals change and grow
  • Living things are part of a system
  • Types and patterns of weather
  • Seasonal changes affect living things
  • Plants as producers
  • The Scientific Method

How we do it

  • Plan and conduct simple investigations
  • Gather and display data
  • Projects, writing activities and discussions
  • Group and independent activities utilizing technology (i.e. IPads, Smartboard)
  • Lessons and activities from Science Fusion
  • Collaborative projects and activities
  • Quizzes and tests

Accommodations

  • Verbal prompting
  • Vary time allotted for tasks
  • Vary number of tasks
  • Visual maps/charts
  • Redirection

Grade 2 Social Studies

What We Do

  • Native American cultures, past and present
  • Changes in community life
  • Natural, human and capital resources
  • Goods and services
  • The responsibilities of a good citizen
  • Citizens of Virginia
  • Map skills

How we do it

  • Projects, writing activities and discussions
  • Collaborative projects and activities
  • Group and independent activities utilizing technology (i.e. IPads, Smartboard)
  • Quizzes and tests

Accommodations

  • Verbal prompting
  • Vary time allotted for tasks
  • Vary number of tasks
  • Visual maps/charts
  • Redirection

Grade 3 Math

What We Do

  • Place value, groups of hundreds, tens and ones
  • Multiplication and division
  • Estimate sums, differences and products
  • Model and compare fractions
  • Plane and solid geometric figures
  • Perimeter, points, lines and rays
  • Standard and nonstandard measurement
  • US Customary and metric units
  • Graphs, data collection

How we do it

  • Examine multiplication through numerical patterns and use of sets
  • Drill and practice
  • Problem solving
  • Lessons and activities from Math Connects
  • Create bar graphs and pie charts to represent data
  • Use of Manipulatives (i.e. counters, number line, base 10 blocks, fraction tiles, Geoboards)
  • Games and practice in both independent and small group settings
  • Group and independent activities utilizing technology (i.e. IPads, Smartboard)

Accommodations

  • Redirection
  • Use of number lines and maps
  • Use of calculators
  • Shortened lessons with fewer problems
  • Hands-on activities, such as construction of geometric shapes and figures
  • Large- numbered rulers
  • Guided practice
  • Repetition
  • Multiplication and division charts
  • Use of graph paper for organization of work
  • Individualized instruction

Grade 3 Reading

What We Do

  • Decode regular multisyllabic words
  • Read aloud various types of  text fluently and accurately, with appropriate pacing, intonation and expression
  • Use knowledge of antonyms, synonyms, homophones and homographs to determine the meanings of words
  • Demonstrate comprehension of fictional text and poetry including main idea and details, cause and effect, comparing and contrasting, fact and fiction.
  • Demonstrate comprehension of nonfictional text and reference materials

How we do it

  • Whole group, small group and individualized instruction
  • Exposure to a variety of genres, comprehension strategies and decoding skills.
  • Games and activities
  • Alternative assessments
  • Story mapping
  • Role playing
  • Computer assisted instruction
  • Group and independent activities utilizing technology (i.e. IPads, Smartboard)
  • Reading Street, Wilson Reading Program materials

Accommodations

  • Redirection
  • Repetition of directions
  • Verbal cues
  • Shortened lessons
  • Dictation of written work to teacher
  • Guided practice
  • Choice of oral or written tasks
  • Set wait time to work on and finish tasks
  • Oral presentation of reading material by the teacher
  • Graphic organizers

Grade 3 Language Arts/Spelling/Handwriting

What We Do

  • Create a single paragraph, develop a topic sentence and include simple concrete details, commentary and a conclusion sentence
  • Revise drafts to improve the coherence and logical progression of ideas
  • Identify and use subjects and verbs correctly

How we do it

  • Whole group, small group and individualized instruction
  • Games and activities
  • Alternative assessments
  • Computer assisted instruction
  • Group and independent activities utilizing technology (i.e. IPads, Smartboard)
  • Handwriting Without Tears and Zaner-Bloser Handwriting are leading, multi-sensory and fun curricula for handwriting mastery. 

Accommodations

  • Redirection
  • Verbal prompting
  • Use of computer for writing
  • Dictation of ideas to teacher for writing
  • Provision of word banks

Grade 3 Science

What We Do

  • Simple machines
  • Physical properties of matter
  • Animal adaptations
  • The interdependency of plants and animals
  • The Scientific Method

How we do it

  • Plan and conduct simple investigations
  • Gather and display data
  • Projects, writing activities and discussions
  • Lessons and activities from Science Fusion
  • Collaborative projects and activities
  • Group and independent activities utilizing technology (i.e. IPads, Smartboard)
  • Quizzes and tests

Accommodations

  • Verbal prompting
  • Vary time allotted for tasks
  • Vary number of tasks
  • Visual maps/charts
  • Redirection

Grade 3 Social Studies

What We Do

  • Exploration of the Americas
  • Production and trade
  • Government and the community
  • The principles of a Republican form of Government
  • Diversity in America
  • Map skills

How we do it

  • Projects, writing activities and discussions
  • Timelinks: Exploring People, Places and Cultures
  • Collaborative projects and activities
  • Group and independent activities utilizing technology (i.e. IPads, Smartboard)
  • Quizzes and tests

Accommodations

  • Verbal prompting
  • Vary time allotted for tasks
  • Vary number of tasks
  • Visual maps/charts
  • Redirection

Grade 4 Math

What We Do

  • Multiplication and division
  • Solve word problems and division stories 
  • Compare and order fractions
  • Introduction to decimals, averages and probability 
  • Estimation and measurement with US Customary and metric units
  • Geometry

How we do it

  • Drill and practice
  • Problem Solving
  • Use of Manipulatives (i.e. counters, number line, base 10 blocks, fraction tiles, Geoboards)
  • Lessons and activities from Math Connects
  • Games and practice in both independent and small group settings
  • Group and independent activities utilizing technology (i.e. IPads, Smartboard)
  • Investigations, pre- and post- assessments
  • Homework assessments
  • Word problems

Accommodations

  • Redirection
  • Use of number lines and maps
  • Use of calculators
  • Shortened lessons with fewer problems
  • Hands-on activities, such as construction of geometric shapes and figures
  • Large- numbered rulers
  • Guided practice
  • Repetition
  • Individualized instruction
  • Multiplication and division charts
  • Use of graph paper for organization of work

Grade 4 Reading

What We Do

  • Apply knowledge of word origins, prefixes, suffixes, root words
  • Understand figurative language (e.g., simile, metaphor, hyperbole, personification) and how each is used
  • Demonstrate comprehension of fictional text and poetry including main idea and details, cause and effect, comparing and contrasting, fact and fiction.
  • Demonstrate comprehension of nonfictional text and reference materials

How we do it

  • Whole group, small group and individualized instruction
  • Exposure to a variety of genres, comprehension strategies and decoding skills.
  • Games and activities
  • Alternative assessments
  • Story mapping
  • Role playing
  • Computer assisted instruction
  • Group and independent activities utilizing technology (i.e. IPads, Smartboard)
  • Reading Street, Wilson Reading Program materials, Novels

Accommodations

  • Redirection
  • Repetition of directions
  • Verbal cues
  • Shortened lessons
  • Dictation of written work to teacher
  • Guided practice
  • Choice of oral or written tasks
  • Set wait time to work on and finish tasks
  • Oral presentation of reading material by the teacher
  • Graphic organizers

Grade 4 Language Arts/Spelling/Handwriting

What We Do

  • Develop a single paragraph with a topic sentence and include multiple concrete details, commentaries  and a conclusion sentence
  • Revise drafts for correct grammar, punctuation, capitalization and spelling

How we do it

  • Whole group, small group and individualized instruction
  • Games and activities
  • Alternative assessments
  • Computer assisted instruction
  • Group and independent activities utilizing technology (i.e. IPads, Smartboard)
  • Zaner-Bloser Handwriting is a leading, multi-sensory and fun curriculum for handwriting mastery.

Accommodations

  • Redirection
  • Verbal prompting
  • Use of computer for writing
  • Dictation of ideas to teacher for writing
  • Provision of word banks

Grade 4 Science

What We Do

  • Characteristics of motion
  • Electricity
  • Plant and animal interactions in an ecosystem
  • Weather
  • Natural Resources
  • The Scientific Method

How we do it

  • Plan and conduct simple investigations
  • Gather and display data
  • Projects, writing activities and discussions
  • Lessons and activities from Science Fusion
  • Collaborative projects and activities
  • Group and independent activities utilizing technology (i.e. IPads, Smartboard)
  • Quizzes and tests

Accommodations

  • Verbal prompting
  • Vary time allotted for tasks
  • Vary number of tasks
  • Visual maps/charts
  • Redirection

Grade 4 Social Studies

What We Do

  • Physical geography and people of Virginia
  • The settlement of Jamestown
  • Life in the Virginia colony
  • Virginia from the Revolution through the Reconstruction

How we do it

  • Projects, multi-paragraph writing and discussions
  • Multimedia projects and presentations
  • Individual reflection, research and writing
  • Timelinks: Virginia Studies
  • Collaborative projects and activities
  • Group and independent activities utilizing technology (i.e. IPads, Smartboard)
  • Quizzes and tests

Accommodations

  • Verbal prompting
  • Vary time allotted for tasks
  • Vary number of tasks
  • Visual maps/charts
  • Redirection

 

 

Grade 5 Math

What We Do

  • Estimation and problem solving
  • Numbers and operations, whole number operations
  • Number theories and properties, order of operations, property of zero, distributive, associative, commutative, and identity properties
  • Decimal operations, fraction operations, rates and ratios
  • Measurement, data interpretation and probability
  • Perimeter, area and volume
  • Geometry

How we do it

  • Logic and applied story problems
  • Use of Manipulatives (i.e. counters, number line, base 10 blocks, fraction tiles, Geoboards)
  • Games and practice in both independent and small group settings
  • Lessons and activities from Math Connects
  • Group and independent activities utilizing technology (i.e. IPads, Smartboard)
  • Investigations, pre- and post- assessments
  • Homework assessments

Accommodations

  • Redirection
  • Use of number lines and maps
  • Use of calculators
  • Shortened lessons with fewer problems
  • Hands-on activities, such as construction of geometric shapes and figures
  • Large- numbered rulers
  • Guided practice
  • Repetition
  • Multiplication and division charts
  • Use of graph paper for organization of work
  • Individualized instruction

Grade 5 Reading

What We Do

  • Read on-level prose and poetry orally with accuracy, appropriate rate and expression
  • Demonstrate comprehension of fictional text and poetry including main idea and details, cause and effect, comparing and contrasting, fact and fiction.
  • Demonstrate comprehension of nonfictional text and reference materials

How we do it

  • Whole group, small group and individualized instruction
  • Exposure to a variety of genres, comprehension strategies and decoding skills.
  • Games and activities
  • Alternative assessments
  • Story mapping
  • Role playing
  • Computer assisted instruction
  • Group and independent activities utilizing technology (i.e. IPads, Smartboard)
  • Reading Street, Wilson Reading Program materials, Novels

Accommodations

  • Redirection
  • Repetition of directions
  • Verbal cues
  • Shortened lessons
  • Dictation of written work to teacher
  • Guided practice
  • Choice of oral or written tasks
  • Set wait time to work on and finish tasks
  • Oral presentation of reading material by the teacher
  • Graphic organizers

Grade 5 Language Arts/Spelling/Handwriting

What We Do

  • Write for a variety of purposes
  • Revise drafts for correct grammar, punctuation, capitalization and spelling

How we do it

  • Multimedia projects and presentations
  • Individual reflection, research and writing including journals
  • Collaborative projects and activities
  • Whole group, small group and individualized instruction
  • Games and activities
  • Alternative assessments
  • Computer assisted instruction
  • Group and independent activities utilizing technology (i.e. IPads, Smartboard)
  • Zaner-Bloser Handwriting is a leading, multi-sensory and fun curriculum for handwriting mastery. 

Accommodations

  • Guidelines for writing
  • Set wait time to complete tasks
  • Redirection; Verbal cues
  • Use of computer for writing
  • Dictation of ideas to teacher

Grade 5 Science

What We Do

  • Sound and light
  • Matter
  • Organisms are made of cells
  • Characteristics of the ocean
  • The earth’s surface
  • The Scientific Method

How we do it

  • Plan and conduct simple investigations
  • Gather and display data
  • Projects, writing activities and discussions
  • Lessons and activities from Science Fusion
  • Collaborative projects and activities
  • Group and independent activities utilizing technology (i.e. IPads, Smartboard)
  • Quizzes and tests

Accommodations

  • Verbal prompting
  • Vary time allotted for tasks
  • Vary number of tasks
  • Visual maps/charts
  • Redirection

Grade 5 Social Studies

What We Do

  • Early cultures in North America
  • European exploration of North America
  • The evolution of America from the Colonial period through the Reconstruction

How we do it

  • Projects, multi-paragraph writing and discussions
  • Multimedia projects and presentations
  • Individual reflection, research and writing
  • Timelinks: The United States, The Early Years
  • Collaborative projects and activities
  • Group and independent activities utilizing technology (i.e. IPads, Smartboard)
  • Quizzes and tests

Accommodations

  • Verbal prompting
  • Vary time allotted for tasks
  • Vary number of tasks
  • Visual maps/charts
  • Redirection

Grade 6 Math

What We Do

  • Whole number operations, basic arithmetic operations, estimation, complex problem-solving using whole numbers and complex problem-solving using decimals
  • Comparing and ordering fractions and finding fraction/decimal equivalents
  • Evaluation of simple numerical phrases with one or two algebraic variables
  • Squares of whole numbers, Pythagorean Theorem
  • Linear measurement 

How we do it

  • Logic and applied story problems
  • Use of manipulatives (i.e. counters, number line, base 10 blocks, fraction tiles, geoboards)
  • Lessons and activities from Math Connects
  • Games and practice in both independent and small group settings
  • Group and independent activities utilizing technology (i.e. IPads, Smartboard)
  • Investigations, pre- and post-assessments
  • Homework assessments

Accommodations

  • Use of number lines
  • Shortened lessons
  • Set wait time to complete tasks
  • Redirection
  • Use of calculators
  • Repetition
  • Guided practice
  • Allow individual pace
  • Multiplication and division charts
  • Use of graph paper for organization of work

Grade 6 Science

What We Do

  • What is energy?
  • Solar energy
  • Matter is composed of atoms
  • Characteristics of water
  • Air and the Earth’s atmosphere
  • The Solar System
  • The Scientific Method

How we do it

  • Plan and conduct simple investigations
  • Gather and display data
  • Projects, writing activities and discussions
  • Collaborative projects and activities
  • Group and independent activities utilizing technology (i.e. IPads, Smartboard)
  • Quizzes and tests

Accommodations

  • Verbal prompting
  • Vary time allotted for tasks
  • Vary number of tasks
  • Visual maps/charts
  • Redirection

Grade 6 Social Studies

What We Do

  • The effects of the Reconstruction on American life
  • Life after the Civil War
  • The changing role of the United States of America through World War I
  • Social, technological and economic changes of the early 20th century

How we do it

  • Projects, multi-paragraph writing and discussions
  • Multimedia projects and presentations
  • Reading from various primary and secondary sources
  • Individual reflection, research and writing
  • Collaborative projects and activities
  • Group and independent activities utilizing technology (i.e. IPads, Smartboard)
  • Quizzes and tests

Accommodations

  • Verbal prompting
  • Vary time allotted for tasks
  • Vary number of tasks
  • Visual maps/charts
  • Redirection

Grades 6, 7 and 8 Language Arts

What we do:

Language Arts seeks to meet the individualized academic needs of all students through a focus on reading, decoding and comprehension skills, as well as understanding grammar and enhancing individual and group communications. Understanding and utilizing the English language properly is fundamental to any student’s success both in education and career by helping them to master reading, communicating, and analytical skills.  Integrating vocabulary, spelling, and context analysis, mastering decoding and fluency contributes to the development of better comprehension skills.  Grammar instruction focuses on strengthening written and oral communication by teaching the mechanics of the written and spoken language.  By promoting self-expression and critical thinking skills Language Arts endeavors not only to increase students’ capacity for understanding the English language but also builds confidence and self-esteem.

How we do it:

Instructional Strategies

The following instructional strategies are utilized in this course:

  • Oral and written exercises
  • Orton approach to the study of phonics and total language
  • Modeling
  • Guided and independent practice
  • Open discussions and brainstorming
  • Graphic organizers
  • Pre-teach vocabulary
  • Visual and oral representations for comprehension
  • Visualization activities
  • Written comprehension prompts and exercises
  • Cooperative learning
  • Peer editing
  • Free-writing
  • Paragraph frames
  • Lecture
  • Drill & practice
  • Essays
  • Research projects
  • Brain storming & focused imaging
  • Field trips
  • Games
  • Didactic, Socratic and open-ended questioning strategies
  • Jigsaw, Think, Pair, Share and other peer learning strategies
  • Wait time

Grades 6, 7 and 8 Reading Decoding

What we do:

Reading decoding specifically addresses student difficulties in the area of decoding and spelling.  This course will provide reading instruction using the PhonicsBoost reading program that incorporates various reading aspects in each lesson.  All lessons focus on reading accurately and include opportunities for students to practice reading aloud.  With explicit instruction and practice, students will become more accurate, efficient, and confident in their reading abilities.

How we do it: 

  • Orton approach to the study of phonics and total language
  • Written and oral drills
  • Written and visual repetition of words
  • Fluency lists
  • Visual and oral representation of ideas for comprehension
  • Guided and independent practice
  • Modeling
  • Spelling rules
  • Rubrics
  • Wait time
  • Syllable type recognition

Grades 6, 7 and 8 Reading Comprehension

What we do:

Comprehension focuses on the remediation of comprehension skills.  Students focus on a fundamental level of mastery for each of the specific skill objectives for this course, in an effort to supplement the appropriate language arts course for each individual student demonstrating a need for specific guided instruction in these areas.

How we do it:

The following instructional strategies are utilized in this course:

  • Orton approach to the study of phonics and total language
  • Written and oral drills
  • Written and visual repetition of words
  • Visual and oral representation of ideas for comprehension
  • Guided and independent practice
  • Modeling of interactive reading
  • Rubrics

Grades 7 and 8 Math

What we do:

Math in grades 7 and 8 seeks to meet the individualized academic needs of all students by focusing on computation and problem solving that relates to real-life situations.  The Math sequence will provide students with the fundamental skills they will need to be successful in future math courses. Emphasis is placed on problem solving involving consumer applications and proportional reasoning.  Students will further develop an understanding of the properties of real numbers and data analysis techniques, which are necessary for success in higher-level math courses.  Students will apply mathematical concepts and skills and the relationship among them to solve problem situations of varying complexities.  Through constant exercises, students will develop a repertoire of skills and strategies for solving a variety of problems.

How we do it:     

  • Real life applications
  • Physical models
  • Games
  • Mental math
  • Modeling and providing examples
  • Direct instruction
  • Didactic questions
  • Guided practice
  • Independent practice
  • Experiments and trials
  • Problem solving
  • Hands-on activities
  • Daily warm-ups
  • Pre-tests

Grade 7 Science

Life Science

What we do:

This course will create an understanding of organization in living things, including systems of classification, cycles and patterns. Students will explore the concepts of cellular organization, relationships among organisms in an ecosystem, and patterns in genetics.  Students will conduct investigations and analyze data to increase understanding of the experimental nature of science.  They will understand humans’ impact on the environment and how sustainability through natural cooperation is a natural part of nature.

How we do it: 

  • Cooperative learning/peer partner learning
  • Hand-on and virtual labs
  • Modeling
  • Hands-on activities and labs
  • Multisensory presentations
  • Introduce relevant vocabulary prior to beginning a new topic of study
  • Pre-teaching lesson by having lesson overview on board
  • Field trips, outdoor classrooms
  • Open-ended questions and discussion
  • Alternative assessments

Grade 8 Science

Physical Science

What we do:

Physical Science builds on skills of investigation, variables and trials.  Gathering data skills are more in-depth at a higher level of analysis. Students plan and conduct research through hands-on labs and literature review Physical Science stresses the understanding of the structure of matter, the characteristics of energy and how they are recognized in nature.  Major areas covered include the organization and use of the periodic table; physical and chemical changes; nuclear reactions; temperature and heat; sound; light; electricity and magnetism.  This is seen all within the context of work, force, and motion.

How we do it:

  • Hand-on and virtual labs
  • Modeling
  • Hands-on activities and labs
  • Multi-sensory presentations
  • Introduce relevant vocabulary prior to beginning a new topic of study
  • Pre-teaching lesson by having lesson overview on board
  • Field Trips, Outdoor Classroom
  • Open-ended questions and discussion
  • Alternative Assessments

Grade 7 Social Studies

Civics

What we do:

Students taking Civics will develop a sense of patriotism and duty in addition to an informed interest in American politics.  The students will gain knowledge of the structures, principles, and functions of government on local, state and national levels.  In addition to the meaningful content, students will further develop skills such as analysis and interpretation of text, and organization of data and ideas.  Ultimately, students will understand the duties, privileges, and meaning of American citizenship, enabling them to cultivate their own emerging role within citizenry.

How we do it: 

  • Reflective discussion
  • Lecture
  • Drill & practice
  • Compare & contrast
  • Maps, charts, and timelines
  • Structured study guides
  • Modeling
  • Concept mapping
  • Games
  • Computer assisted instruction
  • Assigned questions
  • Research projects
  • Debates
  • Peer partner learning
  • Brainstorming
  • Introduce relevant vocabulary prior to beginning a new topic of study
  • Simulations
  • PowerPoint presentations

Grade 8 Social Studies

Ancient History

What we do:

Ancient History enables student to explore the historical development of people, places, and patterns of life from ancient times until 1500 A.D.  Students engage in historical thinking through exercising historical comprehension skills, chronological thinking, historical analysis and interpretation, historical research, and decision making. 

How we do it:

  • Reflective Discussion
  • Lecture
  • Drill & Practice
  • Compare & Contrast
  • Maps, charts, and timelines
  • Structured study guides
  • Modeling
  • Concept Mapping
  • Games
  • Computer Assisted Instruction
  • Assigned Questions
  • Research Projects
  • Debates

Grades 6, 7, and 8 Writing

What we do:

Writing is broken into an in-depth study and/or review of English grammar and a comprehensive practice of writing paragraphs and essays, such as narration, exposition, persuasion, argumentation, and style analysis. Teachers assess each student’s individual progress and decide what each student needs to move their writing forward.  Writing is implemented daily, so students continue the process of developing the craft of writing.  It relies on kinesthetic learning at the keyboard to increase compositional fluency.

How we do it:

Direct Instruction

  • Lecture
  • Explicit teaching
  • Drill and practice

Indirect Instruction

  • Problem solving
  • Case studies
  • Reading for meaning
  • Reflective discussion
  • Writing to inform
  • Concept mapping

Experimental Learning

  • Narratives
  • Storytelling

Independent Study

  • Essays
  • Computer assisted instruction
  • Research projects

Interactive Instruction

  • Brainstorming
  • Peer partner learning
  • Discussion
  • Cooperative learning

Instructional Skills

  • Explaining
  • Demonstrating
  • Questioning
  • Questioning techniques
  • Wait time
  • Graphic organizers
  • Self-monitoring strategies

Grade 9 Language Arts

Experiencing Literature

What we do:

A student’s experience of literature should be thematic and structured. To that end, the ninth grade English curriculum introduces genres and literary concepts while focusing on themes in literature such as: Courage & Perseverance, The Search for Self, and Expression of Thoughts through writing, Journeys, Visions of the Future, and Relationships. The teacher will use myriad forms of literature to introduce genres, literary concepts, vocabulary, and utilize texts to prompt thought regarding the theme.

How we do it:

Direct Instruction:

  • Structured Overview
  • Lecture
  • Explicit Teaching
  • Drill & Practice
  • Compare & Contrast
  • Didactic Questions
  • Demonstrations

Indirect Instruction:

  • Problem Solving
  • Case Studies
  • Reading for Meaning
  • Reflective Discussion
  • Writing to Inform
  • Concept formation
  • Concept Mappings / Graphic Organizer
  • Concept Attainment

Experimental Learning:

  • Narratives
  • Storytelling

Independent Study:

  • Assigned questions

Interactive Instruction:

  • Brainstorming
  • Discussion
  • Cooperative Learning

Instructional Skills:

  • Explaining
  • Demonstrating
  • Questioning
  • Questioning Techniques
  • Wait Time
  • Levels of Questions

Others:

  • Alternative Assessments
  • Guided Assisted Reading
  • Guided Reading & Thinking
  • Mind Mapping

Grade 9 Social Studies

Western Civilization

What we do:

Western Civilization begins with The Rise and Fall of the Roman Empire; the Middle Ages; the Renaissance; and the Reformation. The course then dives into major themes and developments in Western history since 1600. Topics include the French Revolution, the emergence and development of the modern nation-state, industrialization, new ideologies such as Marxism, Imperialism, World War l, Russia at the time of the revolutions of 1917, the rise of totalitarianism, and World War II.

How we do it:

Direct Instruction

  • Structured Overview
  • Lecture- PowerPoint
  • Drill and Practice
  • Didactic Questions

Indirect Instruction

  • Case Studies
  • Reading for Meaning
  • Reflective Discussion
  • Writing to Inform

Experimental Learning

  • Narratives
  • Games
  • Storytelling
  • Focused Imaging

Independent Study

  • Essays
  • Computer Assisted Instruction
  • Assigned Question

Interactive Instruction

  • Debates
  • Role Playing
  • Brainstorming
  • Peer Partner Learning
  • Discussion
  • Think, Pair, Share
  • Cooperative Learning

Instructional Skills

  • Explaining
  • Questioning
  • Wait Time

Others

  • Alternative Assessments
  • Graphic Organizers
  • KWL
  • Picture Word Inductive Model
  • Story Mapping

Grade 9 Science

Earth Science

What we do:

Earth Science is designed to be a study of the Earth and Space from their formation to the present. The course content focuses on geology, weather, climate, biogeochemical cycles and space, as well as lab skills needed to perform and analyze experiments. 

How we do it:

Direct Instruction

  • Structured Overview
  • Lecture
  • Explicit Teaching
  • Drill and Practice
  • Compare and Contrast
  • Didactic Question

Indirect Instruction

  • Problem Solving
  • Case Studies
  • Inquiry
  • Reflective Discussion
  • Writing to Inform
  • Concept Formation
  • Concept Attainmen

Experimental Learning

  • Conducting Experiments
  • Simulations
  • Games
  • Storytelling
  • Focused Imaging

Independent Study

  • Essays
  • Computer Assisted Instruction
  • Research Projects
  • Assigned Questions

Interactive Instruction

  • Brainstorming
  • Peer Partner Learning
  • Discussion
  • Problem Solving
  • Structured Controversy

Instructional Skills

  • Explaining
  • Demonstrating
  • Questioning
  • Questioning Techniques
  • Levels of Questions
  • Wait Time

Grade 9 Math

Pre-Algebra:

What we do:

Pre-Algebra is designed to prepare a student for algebra and geometry courses.  The course is taught at each individual student’s pace to ensure mastery of the course objectives.  The focus of the course is targeted individualization for remediation while mastering skills associate with Algebra I objectives. Students are assessed at regular intervals to ensure mastery of the content during the specified period.  If a student demonstrates deficiencies on an assessment the teacher will conduct a re-teach of the material to ensure mastery to an appropriate level as math is a constantly building curriculum and mastery of each objective becomes essential for further study.

How we do it (accommodations)

Direct Instruction

  • Lecture
  • Explicit Teaching
  • Alternative Assessments
  • Drill and Practice
  • Didactic Questions

Indirect Instruction

  • Problem Solving
  • Inquiry
  • Writing to Inform
  • Concept Formation
  • Concept Attainment

Experiential Learning

  • Simulations
  • Games
  • Storytelling

Independent Study

  • Essays
  • Computer Assisted Instruction
  • Research Projects
  • Assigned Questions

Interactive Instruction

  • Peer Partner Learning
  • Discussion
  • Problem Solving

Instructional Skills

  • Explaining
  • Demonstrating
  • Questioning
  • Questioning Techniques
  • Levels of Questions
  • Wait Time

Algebra

What we do:

Algebra I is taught using the traditional objectives.  The course is taught at each individual student’s pace to ensure mastery of the course objectives. The classroom is structured to provide students with ample opportunity to practice and demonstrate the content being presented.  Each day the class begins with a Warm-up exercise based on the homework from the previous day.  The class is then presented with the lesson for the current day with a follow on exercise for students to practice and demonstrate.  It is during the practice and demonstration phase that the teacher works with individual students who may be encountering difficulty or need acceleration and a more challenging exercise.

How we do it (accommodations)

Direct Instruction

  • Lecture
  • Explicit Teaching
  • Drill and Practice
  • Didactic Questions

Indirect Instruction

  • Problem Solving
  • Inquiry
  • Writing to Inform
  • Concept Formation
  • Concept Attainment

Experiential Learning

  • Simulations
  • Games
  • Storytelling

Independent Study

  • Essays
  • Computer Assisted Instruction
  • Research Projects
  • Assigned Questions

Interactive Instruction

  • Peer Partner Learning
  • Discussion
  • Problem Solving

Instructional Skills

  • Explaining
  • Demonstrating
  • Questioning
  • Questioning Techniques
  • Levels of Questions

Grade 10 English

World Literature

What we do:

World literature reinforces the influential writers of different races, cultures, creeds, and ethnicities of the world in a constantly changing global landscape. Students read a variety of works from each major genre, such as Fiction, Non-fiction, Poetry, Drama, and Folk Literature.

Students are taught the importance of active reading—the act of engaging and making connections with what they read. They are encouraged to examine relationships between characters, conflicts,     and situations that often occur in literary works. Also, students are asked to read aloud to strengthen reading and comprehension skills, which enables them to strengthen their vocabulary skills.    

How we do it: (Accommodations)

Direct Instruction:

  • Structured Overview
  • Lecture
  • Explicit Teaching
  • Drill & Practice
  • Compare & Contrast
  • Didactic Questions
  • Demonstrations

Indirect Instruction:

  • Problem Solving
  • Case Studies
  • Reading for Meaning
  • Reflective Discussion
  • Writing to Inform
  • Concept formation
  • Concept Mappings / Graphic Organizer
  • Concept Attainment

Experimental Learning:

  • Narratives
  • Storytelling

Independent Study:

  • Assigned questions

Interactive Instruction:

  • Brainstorming
  • Discussion
  • Cooperative Learning

Instructional Skills:

  • Explaining
  • Demonstrating
  • Questioning
  • Questioning Techniques
  • Wait Time
  • Levels of Questions

Others:

  • Alternative Assessments
  • Guided Assisted Reading
  • Guided Reading & Thinking
  • Mind Mapping

Grade 11 English

American Literature

What we do:

The eleventh-grade student will be able to make and analyze informative and persuasive oral presentations, with attention to the accuracy of evidence and the effectiveness of delivery. An examination of how media influences beliefs and behaviors will be introduced. The student will continue to develop and expand vocabulary. The study of both classic and contemporary American literature will enhance the student’s appreciation for literature. The student will be able to identify the prevalent themes and characterizations present in American literature, which are reflective of history and culture. Students will also use nonfiction texts to draw conclusions and make inferences citing textual support. The student will be able to write clear and accurate personal, professional, and informational correspondence and reports for research and other applications. Grammar development will continue through the application of rules for sentence formation, usage, spelling, and mechanics. The student will develop informative and persuasive writings by locating, evaluating, synthesizing, and documenting information following ethical and legal guidelines.

How we do it (accommodations)

Direct Instruction:

  • Structured overview
  • Lecture
  • Compare and contrast
  • Didactic Questions

Indirect Instruction

  • Inquiry
  • Reflective Discussion
  • Concept Formation

Experimental Learning:

  • Simulations
  • Role Playing
  • Focused Imaging

Independent Study:

  • Computer Assisted Instruction
  • Assigned question

Interactive Instruction

  • Debate
  • Discussions
  • Cooperative Learning
  • Peer Partner Learning

Instructional Skills:

  • Explaining
  • Questioning
  • Questioning techniques
  • Levels of Questions
  • Wait time

Others:

  • Assessments

Grade 12 English

British Literature

What we do:

The twelfth-grade student will use organizational skills and both verbal and nonverbal presentation skills to plan and deliver an effective oral presentation, choosing language and tone appropriate to the audience and purpose. Students will use technology and understanding of media to create, organize, and display knowledge in ways others can access, view, and use. The student will expand general and specialized vocabulary through speaking, listening, reading, and viewing. The student will analyze British literature and literature of other cultures, recognizing major literary forms and their elements. Using nonfiction texts, students will analyze and synthesize information to solve problems. Writing will include the production of informational, expository, and persuasive/argumentative papers, logically organized demonstrating knowledgeable judgments, and effective conclusions. The student will also produce a well-documented major research product, by locating, evaluating, synthesizing, and documenting information following ethical and legal guidelines. The student will demonstrate advanced knowledge of grammatical conventions through writing, editing, and speaking.

How we do it: (Accommodations)

Direct Instruction:

  • Structured overview
  • Lecture
  • Compare and contrast
  • Didactic Questions

Indirect Instruction

  • Inquiry
  • Reflective Discussion
  • Concept Formation

Experimental Learning:

  • Simulations
  • Role Playing
  • Focused Imaging

Independent Study:

  • Computer Assisted Instruction
  • Assigned question

Interactive Instruction

  • Debate
  • Discussions
  • Cooperative Learning
  • Peer Partner Learning

Instructional Skills:

  • Explaining
  • Questioning
  • Questioning techniques
  • Levels of Questions
  • Wait time

Others:

  • Assessments
  • Guided Reading and Thinking

Grade 10 Social Studies

Eastern Civilization

What we do:

History of Eastern Civilization focuses on the history of Japan, China and Southeast Asia from a topical approach. The social, cultural and religious backgrounds of this region are examined with special attention paid to, the “modern histories” of Japan and China, largely focusing on the nineteenth and twentieth century’s.

How we do it:

Direct Instruction

  • Structured Overview
  • Lecture- PowerPoint
  • Drill and Practice
  • Didactic Questions

Indirect Instruction

  • Case Studies
  • Reading for Meaning
  • Reflective Discussion
  • Writing to Inform

Experimental Learning

  • Narratives
  • Games
  • Storytelling
  • Focused Imaging

Independent Study

  • Essays
  • Computer Assisted Instruction
  • Assigned Questions
  • Learning Centers

Interactive Instruction

  • Debates
  • Role Playing
  • Brainstorming
  • Peer Partner Learning
  • Discussion
  • Think, Pair, Share
  • Cooperative Learning

Instructional Skills

  • Explaining
  • Questioning
  • Wait Time

Others

  • Alternative Assessments
  • Graphic Organizers
  • KWL
  • Picture Word Inductive Model
  • Story Mapping

Grade 11 Social Studies

American History

What we do:

This course examines the major turning points in American history beginning with the events leading up to the American Revolution, the origins of our constitution, reform movements, Manifest Destiny, the Civil War and Reconstruction, the impact of the frontier, the changing nature of business and government, World War I, the Great Depression, World War II, the growth of the United States as a world power, the Cold War and the struggle to achieve class, ethnic, racial, and gender equality. The course extends to the modern day. Contemporary world issues such as globalization, economic interdependence, terrorism and world cultures will also factor into our analysis of international conflict and cooperation

How we do it:

Direct Instruction

  • Structured Overview
  • Lecture
  • Drill and Practice
  • Didactic Questions

Indirect Instruction

  • Case Studies
  • Reading for Meaning
  • Reflective Discussion
  • Writing to Inform

Experimental Learning

  • Narratives
  • Simulations
  • Games
  • Storytelling
  • Focused Imaging

Independent Study

  • Essays
  • Computer Assisted Instruction
  • Learning Activity Packages
  • Assigned Questions

Interactive Instruction

  • Peer Partner Learning
  • Discussion
  • Think, Pair, Share
  • Cooperative Learning

Instructional Skills

  • Explaining
  • Questioning
  • Wait Time

Others

  • Alternative Assessments
  • Graphic Organizers
  • Guided Reading and Thinking
  • Picture Word Inductive Model
  • Story Mapping

Grade 12 Social Studies

American Government

What we do it:

American Government is a full year study of the structures, processes and issues of national, state and local government. The course gives emphasis to the responsibilities and rights of citizenship, the skills necessary for critical thinking, and the knowledge appropriate for wise decision making. National government is the focus of one semester. State and local governments are stressed during the second semester.

Critical Components

In order to satisfy the state graduation requirement, American Government classes should deal significantly with:

  • Government: Definition, Formation, and Function Comparative Forms of Government
  • Politics: Citizenry and Government The legislative Branch of Federal Government
  • The Executive Branch of Federal Government The Judicial Branch of Federal Government
  • State and Local Government

How we do it

Direct Instruction

  • Structured Overview
  • Lecture
  • Drill and Practice
  • Didactic Questions

Indirect Instruction

  • Case Studies
  • Reading for Meaning
  • Reflective Discussion
  • Writing to Inform

Experimental Learning

  • Narratives
  • Simulations
  • Games
  • Storytelling
  • Focused Imaging

Independent Study

  • Essays
  • Computer Assisted Instruction
  • Learning Activity Packages
  • Assigned Questions

Interactive Instruction

  • Peer Partner Learning
  • Discussion
  • Think, Pair, Share
  • Cooperative Learning

Instructional Skills

  • Explaining
  • Questioning
  • Wait Time

Others

  • Alternative Assessments
  • Graphic Organizers
  • Guided Reading and Thinking
  • Picture Word Inductive Model
  • Story Mapping

Grade 10 Science

Biology

What we do:

Biology is the study of the living world, including microscopic organisms, fungi, plants, and animals. In Biology it is important to attempt to understand life and life processes. This biology course, therefore, is aimed at introducing principles and concepts that apply to life at all levels of organization, no matter how simple or complex they may be. The course begins by examining those general characteristics that are shared by all living things. These include similarities in chemical makeup, energy usage, ability to reproduce and community involvement. Other themes developed as the course progresses include:

  • Relatedness among living things.
  • Adaptation for survival among living things.
  • The interactions of living things with their environment.

How we do it:

Direct Instruction

  • Structured Overview
  • Lecture
  • Compare and Contrast
  • Didactic Questions

Indirect Instruction

  • Reading for Meaning
  • Inquiry
  • Reflective Discussion
  • Writing to Inform
  • Concept Mapping

Experimental Learning

  • Field Trips
  • Conducting Experiments
  • Simulations
  • Games
  • Field Observations
  • Role Playing
  • Model Building

Independent Study

  • Computer-assisted Instruction
  • Research Projects

Instructional Skills

  • Explaining
  • Demonstrating
  • Questioning
  • Questioning Techniques

Other

  • Alternative Assessments
  • Graphic Organizers
  • Science Fair

Grade 11 Science

Chemistry

What we do:

Chemical concepts, such as atomic theory and its relation to chemical behavior, chemical bonding, the mole and stoichiometry, molecular kinetics, energy relationships, solution dynamics, acids-bases, equilibrium, organic and biological chemistry, and nuclear interactions. Emphasis is placed on the utilization of mathematical, analytical, data acquisition, and communication skills as well as interdisciplinary approaches to discovery. Concepts and skills are reinforced by a strong emphasis on hands-on laboratory experiences and the integration of other branches of science. Applications to society, individuals, and the utilization of technology are included.

How we do it

Direct Instruction

  • Structured Overview
  • Lecture
  • Compare and Contrast
  • Didactic Questions

Indirect Instruction

  • Reading for Meaning
  • Inquiry
  • Reflective Discussion
  • Writing to Inform
  • Concept Mapping

Experimental Learning

  • Field Trips
  • Conducting Experiments
  • Simulations
  • Games
  • Field Observations
  • Role Playing
  • Model Building

Independent Study

  • Computer-assisted Instruction
  • Research Projects

Instructional Skills

  • Explaining
  • Demonstrating
  • Questioning
  • Questioning Techniques

Other

  • Alternative Assessments
  • Graphic Organizers

Grade 12 Science

Physics

What we do:

This course is a standards-based study of fundamental chemical concepts, such as atomic theory and its relation to chemical behavior, chemical bonding, the mole and stoichiometry, molecular kinetics, energy relationships, solution dynamics, acids-bases, equilibrium, organic and biological chemistry, and nuclear interactions. Emphasis is placed on the utilization of mathematical, analytical, data acquisition, and communication skills as well as interdisciplinary approaches to discovery. Concepts and skills are reinforced by a strong emphasis on hands-on laboratory experiences and the integration of other branches of science.

How we do it

Direct Instruction

  • Structured Overview
  • Lecture
  • Compare and Contrast
  • Didactic Questions

Indirect Instruction

  • Reading for Meaning
  • Inquiry
  • Reflective Discussion
  • Writing to Inform
  • Concept Mapping

Experimental Learning

  • Field Trips
  • Conducting Experiments
  • Simulations
  • Games
  • Field Observations
  • Role Playing
  • Model Building

Independent Study

  • Computer-assisted Instruction
  • Research Projects

Instructional Skills

  • Explaining
  • Demonstrating
  • Questioning
  • Questioning Techniques

Other

  • Alternative Assessments
  • Graphic Organizers

Grades 10, 11 & 12 Math

Pre-Algebra

What we do:

Pre-Algebra is designed to prepare a student for algebra and geometry courses.  The course is taught at each individual student’s pace to ensure mastery of the course objectives.  The focus of the course is targeted individualization for remediation while mastering skills associate with Algebra I objectives. Students are assessed at regular intervals to ensure mastery of the content during the specified period.  If a student demonstrates deficiencies on an assessment the teacher will conduct a re-teach of the material to ensure mastery to an appropriate level as math is a constantly building curriculum and mastery of each objective becomes essential for further study.

How we do it (accommodations)

Direct Instruction

  • Lecture
  • Explicit Teaching
  • Alternative Assessments
  • Drill and Practice
  • Didactic Questions

Indirect Instruction

  • Problem Solving
  • Inquiry
  • Writing to Inform
  • Concept Formation
  • Concept Attainment

Experiential Learning

  • Simulations
  • Games
  • Storytelling

Independent Study

  • Essays
  • Computer Assisted Instruction
  • Research Projects
  • Assigned Questions

Interactive Instruction

  • Peer Partner Learning
  • Discussion
  • Problem Solving

Instructional Skills

  • Explaining
  • Demonstrating
  • Questioning
  • Questioning Techniques
  • Levels of Questions
  • Wait Time

Algebra

What we do:

Algebra I is taught using the traditional objectives.  The course is taught at each individual student’s pace to ensure mastery of the course objectives. The classroom is structured to provide students with ample opportunity to practice and demonstrate the content being presented.  Each day the class begins with a Warm-up exercise based on the homework from the previous day.  The class is then presented with the lesson for the current day with a follow on exercise for students to practice and demonstrate.  It is during the practice and demonstration phase that the teacher works with individual students who may be encountering difficulty or need acceleration and a more challenging exercise.

How we do it (accommodations)

Direct Instruction

  • Lecture
  • Explicit Teaching
  • Drill and Practice
  • Didactic Questions

Indirect Instruction

  • Problem Solving
  • Inquiry
  • Writing to Inform
  • Concept Formation
  • Concept Attainment

Experiential Learning

  • Simulations
  • Games
  • Storytelling

Independent Study

  • Essays
  • Computer Assisted Instruction
  • Research Projects
  • Assigned Questions

Interactive Instruction

  • Peer Partner Learning
  • Discussion
  • Problem Solving

Instructional Skills

  • Explaining
  • Demonstrating
  • Questioning
  • Questioning Techniques
  • Levels of Questions

Geometry

What we do:

Geometry is taught using the traditional objectives with a strong emphasis on Algebra I skills maintenance and development.  The course is taught at each individual student’s pace to ensure mastery of the course objectives.    The focus of the course is geometric identities, theorems, postulates, and corollaries as well as algebra applications with an emphasis on theory supporting application. Students are assessed at regular intervals to ensure mastery of the content during the specified period.  If a student demonstrates deficiencies on an assessment the teacher will conduct a re-teach of the material to ensure mastery to an appropriate level as math is a constantly building curriculum and mastery of each objective becomes essential for further study.

How we do it:

Direct instruction

  • Lecture
  • Explicit Teaching
  • Drill & Practice
  • Didactic Questions

Indirect Instruction

  • Problem Solving
  • Case Studies
  • Inquiry
  • Concept Formation
  • Concept Mapping

Experimental Learning

  • Games
  • Model Building

Independent Study

  • Computer Assisted Instruction
  • Learning activity packages
  • Assigned Questions

Interactive Instruction

  • Peer Partner Learning
  • Discussion
  • Problem Solving

Instructional Skills

  • Explaining
  • Demonstrating
  • Questioning
  • Wait Time

Others

  • Alternative Assessments
  • Graphic organizers

Algebra II

What we do it:

Algebra II is taught using the traditional objectives.  The course is taught at each individual student’s pace to ensure mastery of the course objectives.  The focus of the course is advanced Algebra applications with a component being the theory supporting the application. Each day the class begins with a Warm-up exercise based on the homework from the previous day.  The class is then presented with the lesson for the current day with a follow on exercise for students to practice and demonstrate.  It is during the practice and demonstration phase that the teacher works with individual students who may be encountering difficulty or need acceleration and a more challenging exercise.

How we do it:

Direct instruction

  • Lecture
  • Explicit Teaching
  • Drill & Practice
  • Didactic Questions

Indirect Instruction

  • Problem Solving
  • Inquiry
  • Concept Formation
  • Concept Mapping

Experimental Learning

  • Games
  • Model Building

Independent Study

  • Computer Assisted Instruction
  • Learning activity packages
  • Assigned Questions

Interactive Instruction

  • Peer Partner Learning
  • Discussion
  • Problem Solving

Instructional Skills

  • Explaining
  • Questioning
  • Wait Time

Others

  • Alternative Assessments
  • Graphic organizers

Pre-Calculus

What we do:

This course is designed to cover topics in Algebra ranging from polynomial, rational, and exponential functions to conic sections.  Trigonometry concepts such as Law of Sines and Cosines will be introduced.  Students will then begin analytic geometry and calculus concepts such as limits, derivatives, and integrals.  This class is important for any student planning to take a college algebra or college pre-calculus class.

How we do it:

Direct Instruction

  • Lecture
  • Explicit Teaching
  • Drill and Practice
  • Compare and Contrast
  • Didactic Questions

Indirect Instruction

  • Reading for Meaning
  • Reflective Discussion
  • Concept Formatting

Experimental Learning

  • Focused Imaging

Independent Study

  • Learning Activity Packages
  • Assigned Questions

Interactive Instructions

  • Debates
  • Discussion
  • Cooperative Learning
  • Problem Solving

Instructional Skills

  • Explaining,
  • Demonstrating
  • Questioning
  • Levels of Questions
  • Wait time

Others

  • Guided Reading and Thinking
  • Self Monitoring Strategies

Grades 9, 10, 11 & 12 Foreign Language

Spanish and French

What we do:

In Spanish and French, students develop  communicative competence by interacting orally and in writing as well as, understanding oral and written messages in Spanish and French, They communicate on a variety of topics at a level commensurate with their study, using more complex structures in Spanish and French moving from concrete to more abstract concepts. They comprehend the main ideas of the authentic materials that they listen to and read and are able to identify significant details when the topics are familiar. Students develop the ability communicate efficiently in Spanish and French.

How we do it:

Direct Instruction

  • Drill & Practice
  • Compare & Contrast
  • Didactic Questions

Indirect Instruction

  • Reading for meaning
  • Reflective Discussion
  • Concept Mapping

Experimental Learning

  • Games
  • Storytelling
  • Role-playing

Interactive Instruction

  • Role-playing

Instructional Skills

  • Explaining
  • Demonstrating
  • Wait time

Grades 9, 10, 11 & 12 Technology

What we do:

Digital Design is a two-year track that combines the elements of advertising design with graphic design.  Students are introduced to the design procedure; they work on design briefs, and are introduced to the elements of design, package design and logo design.  Additionally, students learn fundaments of graphic design and typography. Students also design CBA’s yearbook.

How we do it:

Direct Instruction

  • Lecture
  • Explicit Teaching
  • Drill and Practice
  • Compare and Contrast
  • Didactic Questions

Indirect Instruction

  • Problem Solving
  • Case Studies
  • Reflective Discussion
  • Writing to Inform
  • Concept Formation

Experimental Learning

  • Simulations
  • Games
  • Storytelling
  • Focused Imaging
  • Field Observations
  • Role Playing
  • Surveys

Interactive Instruction

  • Role Playing
  • Brainstorming
  • Peer Partner Learning
  • Discussion
  • Problem Solving

Instructional Skills

  • Explaining
  • Demonstrating
  • Questioning
  • Questioning Techniques
  • Levels of Questions
  • Wait Time

Others

  • Alternative Assessments
  • Picture Books and Illustrator Studies
  • KWL

Grade 9 English

Experiencing Literature

What we do:

A student’s experience of literature should be thematic and structured. To that end, the ninth grade English curriculum introduces genres and literary concepts while focusing on themes in literature such as: Courage & Perseverance, The Search for Self, and Expression of Thoughts through writing, Journeys, Visions of the Future, and Relationships. The teacher will use myriad forms of literature to introduce genres, literary concepts, vocabulary, and utilize texts to prompt thought regarding the theme.

How we do it:

Direct Instruction:

  • Structured Overview
  • Lecture
  • Explicit Teaching
    Drill & Practice
  • Compare & Contrast
  • Didactic Questions
  • Demonstrations

Indirect Instruction:

  • Problem Solving
  • Case Studies
  • Reading for Meaning
  • Reflective Discussion
  • Writing to Inform
  • Concept formation
  • Concept Mappings / Graphic Organizer
  • Concept Attainment

Experimental Learning:

  • Narratives
  • Storytelling

Independent Study:

  • Assigned questions

Interactive Instruction:

  • Brainstorming
  • Discussion
  • Cooperative Learning

Instructional Skills:

  • Explaining
  • Demonstrating
  • Questioning
  • Questioning Techniques
  • Wait Time
  • Levels of Questions

Others:

  • Alternative Assessments
  • Guided Assisted Reading
  • Guided Reading & Thinking
  • Mind Mapping


Grade 9 Writing

What we do:

Writing is broken into an in-depth study and/or review of English grammar and a comprehensive practice of writing paragraphs and essays, such as Narration, Exposition, Persuasion, Argumentation, and Style Analysis. Teachers assess each student’s individual progress and decide what each student needs to move their writing forward. Writing is implemented daily, so students continue the process of developing the craft of writing. It relies on kinesthetic learning at the keyboard to increase compositional fluency.

How we do it:

Direct Instruction

  • Lecture
  • Explicit teaching
  • Drill and practice

Indirect Instruction

  • Problem solving
  • Case studies
  • Reading for meaning
  • Reflective discussion
  • Writing to inform
  • Concept mapping

Experimental Learning

  • Narratives
  • Storytelling

Independent Study

  • Essays
  • Computer assisted instruction
  • Research projects

Interactive Instruction

  • Brainstorming
  • Peer partner learning
  • Discussion
  • Cooperative learning

Instructional Skills

  • Explaining
  • Demonstrating
  • Questioning
  • Questioning techniques
  • Wait time
  • Graphic organizers
  • Self-monitoring strategies

 


 
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